What is the Difference Between a Pie and a Tart?

What is the Difference Between a Pie and a Tart?

Some definitions first. It’s a pie if it’s baked in a one-piece pan with sloping sides. Pies may have a bottom crust only, a top crust only (as in some deep-dish pies), or both a top and a bottom crust.

Pie crust is flaky, light, tender, and crisp.

Tarts are baked in straight-sided pans with removable bottoms. They are always “open-faced,” and although the crust is always “blind-baked”—without a filling—the assembled tart itself is sometimes left unbaked.

Tart crust is crumbly, rich, crisp, and firm.

Some tarts, called galettes, are baked in free-form shapes. A galette doesn’t require a pan at all—just a cookie or pizza sheet. (In fact, you could think of a galette as a sweet, fruity pizza.) The dough is rolled out into a rough circle, the fruit is placed in the center, the edges are folded in, and the whole thing is baked for 20 minutes or so.